The Daily Bungalow

The Daily Bungalow

A history of the way we were in images from the period. 1900 to 1960

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currentsinbiology:

DNA signature found in ice storm babies
The number of days an expectant mother was deprived of electricity during Quebec’s Ice Storm (1998) predicts the epigenetic profile of her child, a new study finds.
Scientists from the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University have detected a distinctive ‘signature’ in the DNA of children born in the aftermath of the massive Quebec ice storm. Five months after the event, researchers recruited women who had been pregnant during the disaster and assessed their degrees of hardship and distress in a study called Project Ice Storm.
Thirteen years later, the researchers found that DNA within the T cells - a type of immune system cell - of 36 children showed distinctive patterns in DNA methylation.
The researchers concluded for the first time that maternal hardship, predicted the degree of methylation of DNA in the T cells. The “epigenetic” signature plays a role in the way the genes express themselves. This study is also the first to show that it is the objective stress exposure (such as days without electricity) and not the degree of emotional distress in pregnant women that causes long lasting changes in the epigenome of their babies.

currentsinbiology:

DNA signature found in ice storm babies

The number of days an expectant mother was deprived of electricity during Quebec’s Ice Storm (1998) predicts the epigenetic profile of her child, a new study finds.

Scientists from the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University have detected a distinctive ‘signature’ in the DNA of children born in the aftermath of the massive Quebec ice storm. Five months after the event, researchers recruited women who had been pregnant during the disaster and assessed their degrees of hardship and distress in a study called Project Ice Storm.

Thirteen years later, the researchers found that DNA within the T cells - a type of immune system cell - of 36 children showed distinctive patterns in DNA methylation.

The researchers concluded for the first time that maternal hardship, predicted the degree of methylation of DNA in the T cells. The “epigenetic” signature plays a role in the way the genes express themselves. This study is also the first to show that it is the objective stress exposure (such as days without electricity) and not the degree of emotional distress in pregnant women that causes long lasting changes in the epigenome of their babies.

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vintageeveryday:

Clint Eastwood skating on the street of Rome, ca. 1960s.

vintageeveryday:

Clint Eastwood skating on the street of Rome, ca. 1960s.

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historicaltimes:

Young spinners in a cotton mill, 1911.

historicaltimes:

Young spinners in a cotton mill, 1911.

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Fisherman & Cats by zoonabar on Flickr.
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Nina Leen - Eva Le Gallienne, Westport

Napping in the garden with a hen…

Nina Leen - Eva Le Gallienne, Westport

Napping in the garden with a hen…

(Source: kulturtava, via bookporn)

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corgiaddict:

OMG this corgi face! BEST FACE!

Saturday!

corgiaddict:

OMG this corgi face! BEST FACE!

Saturday!

(Source: peanutthecorgi)

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vintageeveryday:

Unknown kids taking a bath in buckets, ca. 1910s.

vintageeveryday:

Unknown kids taking a bath in buckets, ca. 1910s.

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via starry-eyed-wolfchild:

A town known as the “town of books”, Hay-on-Wye is located on the Welsh / English border in the United Kingdom and is a bibliophile’s sanctuary.

(Source: whenonearth.net, via bookporn)

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