The Daily Bungalow

A history of the way we were in images from the period. 1900 to 1960

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Reblogged from usclibraries  82 notes
usclibraries:

Helms Bakery trucks once delivered freshly baked goods to neighborhoods across Southern California. Here’s a truck and its driver in 1931, the year the bakery debuted its fleet. (USC Digital Library/Dick Whittington Photography Collection)

usclibraries:

Helms Bakery trucks once delivered freshly baked goods to neighborhoods across Southern California. Here’s a truck and its driver in 1931, the year the bakery debuted its fleet. (USC Digital Library/Dick Whittington Photography Collection)

Reblogged from currentsinbiology  176 notes
scipak:

Gene-Swapping Plasmids Aid Antibiotic Resistance in Hospitals
Bacteria appear to be swapping antibiotic-resistance genes through mobile pieces of circular DNA called plasmids, and this exchange may be contributing to the alarming rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals. To understand how these plasmids move between bacterial species in a hospital setting, Karen Frank, Tara Palmore, Julie Segre and colleagues spent two years taking environmental samples and surveillance cultures from over one thousand patients at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Over this two-year period they identified 10 patients who harbored carbapenem-resistant bacteria. Using a relatively new technology called long-read genome sequencing to decode and compare plasmid genomes, the NIH team discovered that plasmid-carrying bacteria are exchanging antibiotic-resistant genes in the biofilms of sink drains. However, they do not have any evidence of transfer of bacteria from the sink to any of the patients. The authors note that patients who carry the bacteria may not be sick, but can still pass carbapenem-resistant bacteria onto others. The study offers evidence that plasmid transfer in healthcare settings is likely aiding the increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
Read more about this research from the 17 September issue of Science Translational Medicine here.
[Image courtesy of Darryl Leja, NHGRI/NIH. Please click here for more information.]
© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.


I have wondered about this for years. Now how do we change it?

scipak:

Gene-Swapping Plasmids Aid Antibiotic Resistance in Hospitals

Bacteria appear to be swapping antibiotic-resistance genes through mobile pieces of circular DNA called plasmids, and this exchange may be contributing to the alarming rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals. To understand how these plasmids move between bacterial species in a hospital setting, Karen Frank, Tara Palmore, Julie Segre and colleagues spent two years taking environmental samples and surveillance cultures from over one thousand patients at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Over this two-year period they identified 10 patients who harbored carbapenem-resistant bacteria. Using a relatively new technology called long-read genome sequencing to decode and compare plasmid genomes, the NIH team discovered that plasmid-carrying bacteria are exchanging antibiotic-resistant genes in the biofilms of sink drains. However, they do not have any evidence of transfer of bacteria from the sink to any of the patients. The authors note that patients who carry the bacteria may not be sick, but can still pass carbapenem-resistant bacteria onto others. The study offers evidence that plasmid transfer in healthcare settings is likely aiding the increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Read more about this research from the 17 September issue of Science Translational Medicine here.

[Image courtesy of Darryl Leja, NHGRI/NIH. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

I have wondered about this for years. Now how do we change it?

Reblogged from humansofnewyork  8,910 notes
humansofnewyork:

“We met at a party fifty years ago. He’d just drank a yard of ale when I met him. Do you have that expression here— ‘yard of ale?’ It’s when you pour a pint of ale down a tube, straight into your throat. Anyway, he was feeling quite good. He called me ‘funny face’ that night. And he’s called me ‘funny face’ ever since. We stayed at the party so late that we missed the last bus, and on the walk home we planned our honeymoon.”

humansofnewyork:

“We met at a party fifty years ago. He’d just drank a yard of ale when I met him. Do you have that expression here— ‘yard of ale?’ It’s when you pour a pint of ale down a tube, straight into your throat. Anyway, he was feeling quite good. He called me ‘funny face’ that night. And he’s called me ‘funny face’ ever since. We stayed at the party so late that we missed the last bus, and on the walk home we planned our honeymoon.”