The Daily Bungalow

The Daily Bungalow

A history of the way we were in images from the period. 1900 to 1960

Images (Scans) copyright © Antique Home, 2008-2014
Please contact us if you would like permission to use these images.

We may share images that do not belong to us from time to time. Those images are the property of their respective owners. Ask us if you are unsure.

Ask your questions or Share.
Dear Daily Bungalow

Architect’s Rendering of Bob’s Big Boy Restaurant - San Jose, CA 1966 by hmdavid on Flickr.
Location: 449 South Winchester Blvd., San Jose, CA
Positioned in front of the Century dome theaters and down the street from the Winchester Mystery House, Bob’s Big Boy served up burgers and shakes from the mid-1960s to the late 1980s.  The Bob’s building, with its rock pillars and convex roofline, was designed by the Los Angeles based architectural firm, Armet and Davis, and is a prime example of “Coffee Shop Modern.”  Fortunately, when the folks at Flames took over from Bob, they did little to alter the building’s exterior.  Today, Flames Coffee Shop on Winchester Blvd. looks much like its predecessor, although one thing you’ll notice is that the original sign’s characteristic spike has been shortened.
Image appears courtesy Armet Davis & Newlove AIA Architects - AKA “the Godfathers of Googie.”  For more classic buildings by Armet & Davis, see www.googieart.com

Architect’s Rendering of Bob’s Big Boy Restaurant - San Jose, CA 1966 by hmdavid on Flickr.


Location: 449 South Winchester Blvd., San Jose, CA
Positioned in front of the Century dome theaters and down the street from the Winchester Mystery House, Bob’s Big Boy served up burgers and shakes from the mid-1960s to the late 1980s. The Bob’s building, with its rock pillars and convex roofline, was designed by the Los Angeles based architectural firm, Armet and Davis, and is a prime example of “Coffee Shop Modern.” Fortunately, when the folks at Flames took over from Bob, they did little to alter the building’s exterior. Today, Flames Coffee Shop on Winchester Blvd. looks much like its predecessor, although one thing you’ll notice is that the original sign’s characteristic spike has been shortened.
Image appears courtesy Armet Davis & Newlove AIA Architects - AKA “the Godfathers of Googie.” For more classic buildings by Armet & Davis, see www.googieart.com

Comments (View)
blog comments powered by Disqus