The Daily Bungalow

The Daily Bungalow

A history of the way we were in images from the period. 1900 to 1960

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Dear Daily Bungalow

462 church cobblestone by southofbloor on Flickr.
Perhaps the most refined of the lot  - not a huge house but full of thoughtful detail and material consideration.  Hammered fieldstone foundation with smaller cobbles above, and the porch finely crafted with round cobble columns and varied sizing of stone between railing and structure.  The Chimney is particularly satisfying with its brick cap, as are the shallow projecting bays.  Like a lot of other cobblestone houses, the material is extended out into the landscape through fence piers along the south side driveway.  
Designed by Leybourne and Whitney, it was published in the Evening Record on March 7 1913, possibly for Henry H. Boulton.  Apparently this was Windsor’s first cobblestone bungalow.www.internationalmetropolis.com/?p=2781
That article shows a drawing of the house and the following text.
“Evening Record, March 7, 1913.
This is a perspective drawing of the first cobblestone bungalow to be erected in Windsor. The gables of the second story will be of a dark pressed brick, with grey joints in contrast to the cobblestones, below which will be laid in dark cement mortar. The base course will be of hammer dressed field stones. The interior will be finished in oak with oak floors. One will pass from the entrance hall into a long, low beamed ceiling living room, with a cozy fireplace at the end. The dining room opening from this room will have paneled walls and a bay window with a window seat. In addition to the above there will be a sun parlor, a bed room, bath room and kitchen on the first floor, with two bedrooms, a sewing room, and sleeping porch on the second floor. The bath room will have a white enameled tile floor and tile walls and fitted complete, including a shower bath. All interior fittings, book cases, window seats, wardrobes, etc., have been especially designed to harmonize with the entire building. Leybourne & Whitney are the architects.”

462 church cobblestone by southofbloor on Flickr.


Perhaps the most refined of the lot - not a huge house but full of thoughtful detail and material consideration. Hammered fieldstone foundation with smaller cobbles above, and the porch finely crafted with round cobble columns and varied sizing of stone between railing and structure. The Chimney is particularly satisfying with its brick cap, as are the shallow projecting bays. Like a lot of other cobblestone houses, the material is extended out into the landscape through fence piers along the south side driveway.

Designed by Leybourne and Whitney, it was published in the Evening Record on March 7 1913, possibly for Henry H. Boulton. Apparently this was Windsor’s first cobblestone bungalow.

www.internationalmetropolis.com/?p=2781

That article shows a drawing of the house and the following text.


“Evening Record, March 7, 1913.

This is a perspective drawing of the first cobblestone bungalow to be erected in Windsor. The gables of the second story will be of a dark pressed brick, with grey joints in contrast to the cobblestones, below which will be laid in dark cement mortar. The base course will be of hammer dressed field stones. The interior will be finished in oak with oak floors. One will pass from the entrance hall into a long, low beamed ceiling living room, with a cozy fireplace at the end. The dining room opening from this room will have paneled walls and a bay window with a window seat. In addition to the above there will be a sun parlor, a bed room, bath room and kitchen on the first floor, with two bedrooms, a sewing room, and sleeping porch on the second floor. The bath room will have a white enameled tile floor and tile walls and fitted complete, including a shower bath. All interior fittings, book cases, window seats, wardrobes, etc., have been especially designed to harmonize with the entire building. Leybourne & Whitney are the architects.”

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